• Representing kids: U-M’s Child Advocacy Law Clinic a voice for Michigan children, families

    ANN ARBOR—It’s not easy to miss the faded black, free-standing heavy bag in Ashley Burbanks’ townhouse. The bag, with a 6-inch tear on top, is next to the kitchen island, visible to family and guests who enter the Ann Arbor home.

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  • Large summer harmful algal bloom predicted for western Lake Erie

    ANN ARBOR—University of Michigan researchers and their partners are forecasting that western Lake Erie will experience a significant harmful algal bloom this summer. Scientists expect this year’s bloom to measure 7.5 on the severity index, but it could possibly range between 6 and 9. An index above 5 indicates blooms having greater impact. The severity Read more

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  • An ‘EpiPen’ for spinal cord injuries

    ANN ARBOR—An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body’s immune system from overreacting to trauma, potentially preventing some spinal cord injuries from resulting in paralysis. The approach was demonstrated in mice at the University of Michigan, with the nanoparticles enhancing healing by reprogramming the aggressive immune cells—call it an “EpiPen” for trauma to the central Read more

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  • New research shows a glaring lack of transparency in environmental organizations

    ANN ARBOR—New research finds that environmental organizations are still reluctant to release data or report on the gender, race and LGBTQ composition of their staff. In a study conducted by Dorceta Taylor of the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability, initial findings reveal that environmental organizations are generally hesitant to make their demographic Read more

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  • New parents spend more on fruits and vegetables

    ANN ARBOR—New parents spend more money on fresh fruits and vegetables than before having children, according to a new University of Michigan study that indicates this key moment in parents’ lives could be used to create interventions that support healthier eating habits. “When people become parents, they may be more likely to change their eating Read more

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  • Screen size matters: Consumers less attentive to news content on small screens

    ANN ARBOR—If you’re getting your news from a smartphone, size matters. Heart rate variability decreases and changes in sweat are muted when viewing video news content on smaller screens. Both are indications of reduced attentiveness and engagement with content, according to a new study involving researchers at the University of Michigan and Texas A&M University. Read more

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  • ‘Digital alchemy’ to reverse-engineer new materials

    ANN ARBOR—In work that upends materials design, researchers have demonstrated with computer simulations that they can design a crystal and work backward to the particle shape that will self-assemble to create it. It could lead to a new class of materials, such as crystal coatings that produce colors that never fade. “These results turn materials Read more

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  • How common elements can make a more energy-secure future

    ANN ARBOR—Thin-film solar panels, the cell phone in your hand and the LED bulb lighting your home are all made using some of the rarest, most expensive elements found on the planet. An international team including researchers at the University of Michigan has devised a way to make these kinds of optoelectronic materials from cheaper, Read more

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  • Experts in the News: Andrei Markovits on the global rise of women’s soccer