Detroit’s presidential debates: U-M experts available to discuss

July 26, 2019
Contact: Jared Wadley jwadley@umich.edu

EXPERTS ADVISORY

The second Democratic Party debates for the presidential nomination occur July 30-31 in Detroit. University of Michigan experts are available as media resources to discuss various aspects of politics, elections and presidential
debates.Jonathan Hanson

Jonathan Hanson, lecturer at the Ford School of Public Policy, worked as a legislative assistant in Congress. He can discuss the presidential candidates’ strategies, as well as the general positioning of the Democrats versus President Trump.

Contact: 734-615-1496, 315-558-9664 cell, jkhanson@umich.edu


Vincent HutchingsVincent Hutchings, professor of political science, is an expert on public opinion, elections, voting behavior and African American politics.

Contact: 734-764-6591, vincenth@umich.edu

 

 


Tom Ivacko

Tom Ivacko serves as interim director of the Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy and oversees the Michigan Public Policy Survey. He surveys local lawmakers in Michigan about a wide range of state and local government policy topics.
Contact: 734-647-4163, 734-834-4169 cell, tmi@umich.edu

 

 


Aaron KallAaron Kall, director of the Michigan Debate Program and co-author of “The State of the Union is … : Memorable Addresses of the Last Fifty Years,” can discuss the presidential debates.

Contact: 734-764-6808, 734-239-3996 cell, akall@umich.edu

 


Angela Ocampo

Angela Ocampo, an LSA Collegiate Fellow, has research and teaching interests that focus on American politics, political behavior, representation, race and ethnic politics, and quantitative methodology. Her research also explores how political parties and institutional forces shape the path of minorities into elected office. She is fluent in Spanish.

Contact: 914-707-0312 cell, axocampo@umich.edu


Stuart Soroka

Stuart Soroka is the Michael W. Traugott Collegiate Professor of Communication Studies and Political Science. His research focuses on political communication, the sources and/or structure of public preferences for policy, and the relationship between public policy, public opinion and mass media.

Contact: 734-764-0420, ssoroka@umich.edu

 

For specific issues—ranging from the national economy to immigration to health care—visit our Experts Directory to contact other U-M faculty.